[Official] Nerdy Math Topic

Supplementary angles:
Two angles with a sum of 180°.

Vertical angles:
Angles opposite each other where two line crosses.

Adjacent angles:
Two angles that have a common vertex and a common side but do not overlap.

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The whole entire line (angles 1, 2, and 3 put together) is supplementary because supplementary angles form a line.

That conclusion only comes if you completely ignore the question in the top, left hand corner though. That question (the relationship between angle 1 and angle 3) would be answered by “complementary” because all 3 are 180° and subtract 90° for angle 2 and you’re left with 90°.

Basically, you just need to find out what exactly she’s asking for

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I’m sorry. I misunderstood the question.

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Ohh gotcha, tysm. You really helped!

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Of course, no problem!

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e = 2.718281828459045 (easy way to remember: 2.7 1828 1828 45 90 45)

using this, you can calculate hyperbolic functions

sinh(x) = e^x – e^(-x), all over 2

cosh(x) = e^x + e^(-x), all over 2

tanh(x) = e^(2x) – 1, all over e^(2x) + 1

and then there are inverse trigonometry and inverse hyperbolic functions…

sec(x) = 1/cos(x)

csc(x) = 1/sin(x)

cot(x) = 1/tan(x)

sech(x) = 1/cosh(x)

csch(x) = 1/sinh(x)

coth(x) = 1/tanh(x)

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e is a really neat constant. In my opinion, I don’t find hyperbolic functions so interesting, they’re just a solution to a differential equation. I think euler’s formula is a lot neater. Also, using e, you can derive derivatives to many of the standard functions.

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And inverse trig and hyperbolic functions aren’t 1/f(x), they’re f^-1(x) (confusing notation, I know), like arcsin and arccos.

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cool :laughing::grin:

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It is not that kind of inverse.


Google Search: " The secant of x is 1 divided by the cosine of x: sec(x)= 1 ÷ cos(x), and the cosecant of x is defined to be 1 divided by the sine of x: csc(x)= 1 ÷ sin(x)."


sine
cosine
tangent
hyperbolic sine
hyperbolic cosine
hyperbolic tangent
secant
cosecant
cotangent
hyperbolic secant
hyperbolic cosecant
hyperbolic cotangent
inverse sine
inverse cosine
inverse tangent
inverse hyperbolic sine
inverse hyperbolic cosine
inverse hyperbolic tangent
inverse secant
inverse cosecant
inverse cotangent
inverse hyperbolic secant
inverse hyperbolic cosecant
inverse hyperbolic cotangent


these are all of the functions regarding trigonometry

I guess the derivative of trig functions would’ve been better wording…

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I understand what you meant, but you gave examples of reciprocal trig functions, not inverse.

Hyperbolic and trigonometric functions are different.

I’m not sure what you meant here. The derivative of trig functions are other trig functions (slightly more complicated functions, sometimes, with trig functions in them).

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Would examples of that be smth like “derive 4sin((pi/3)x)?” also I’m guessing that would fall under simple derivatives?

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yeah, that’d be a simple trig derivative :))

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Yeah, the answer is just a trig function.
(Btw, derive doesn’t mean to find the derivative of something. It means something else. I think you meant “differentiate”).

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Oh yeah I do lol, thanks :sweat_smile:

And this falls in calc?

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Yeah derivatives are part of calculus. I’m not entirely sure why they were brought up in the first place, though :sweat_smile:

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When I guy comes with the knowledge of a fifth grader
“Math is math you add and multiply”

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